suspended on a sunbeam

October 12, 2014 at 8:10pm
1,496 notes
Reblogged from farhanshk

http://mehreenkasana.tumblr.com/post/99852035993 →

stay-human:

farhanshk:

Malala gets a Nobel prize for being a mascot for West’s ‘War on Terror’ while Pakistan’s PhD Neuroscientist Aafia Siddique is rotting in US prison.

Stop reblogging this shit wtf is wrong with you people—I know a lot of you outside Pakistan don’t even know the…

8:07pm
277,302 notes
Reblogged from melancholic-wallflower

(Source: melancholic-wallflower, via perks-of-being-chinese)

5:32pm
11,645 notes
Reblogged from readyokaygo

http://rcabbasi.tumblr.com/post/99844338810/pax-arabica-so-cray-teas-readyokaygo →

pax-arabica:

so-cray-teas:

readyokaygo:

Atheists realize that very few wars are actually dogmatically fought for a religion, right? If any at all. Most “religious wars” are actually power struggles or imperialist ventures where religion is used by a state, movement, or actor as a…

March 28, 2014 at 4:21pm
128,319 notes
Reblogged from stand-up-comic-gifs

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

(via upworthy)

February 8, 2014 at 3:53pm
33,389 notes
Reblogged from rtrixie

lotuslopez:

rtrixie:

If you wear a hijab, niqab or even burqa, don’t expect me to take you seriously if you tell me how free and liberated you are.

"I’m going to withhold giving you the respect you deserve because I disagree your choice of dress, most likely because I’m an ethnocentrist, an Islamophobe, and an imperialist."

(via occupiedmuslim)

January 19, 2014 at 7:38pm
1,433 notes
Reblogged from muslimwomeninhistory

It is said that Muslims believe in female genital mutilation, the surgical removal of all or part of a girl’s clitoris. Yet I have never, in my 41 years, had a conversation with someone who described themselves as Muslim and believed this practice to be anything other than a despicably inhuman abomination. Until I first read about it in a newspaper, probably in my 20s, I would have thought it impossible that such a ritual could even exist.

Similarly, many millions of Muslims apparently believe that women should have no role in politics. But many millions more have had no qualms electing women prime ministers in Muslim-majority countries such as Pakistan and Bangladesh. Indeed, this month’s Pakistani elections witnessed a record 448 women running for seats in the national and provincial assemblies.

Two of my great-grandparents sent all of their daughters to university. One of them, my grandmother, was the chairperson of the All Pakistan Women’s Association and dedicated her life to the advancement of women’s rights in the country. But among those descended from the same line are women who do not work and who refuse to meet men who are not their blood relatives. I have female relatives my age who cover their heads, others who wear mini-skirts, some who are university professors or run businesses, others who choose rarely to leave their homes. I suspect if you were to ask them their religion, all would say “Islam”. But if you were to use that term to define their politics, careers, or social values, you would struggle to come up with a coherent, unified view.

— Mohsin Hamid, “Islam is Not a Monolith” (via muslimwomeninhistory)

(via bhenchodpatriarchy)

January 9, 2014 at 11:20pm
164,236 notes
Reblogged from unsubstantiatedrumors
coconutting-as-praxis:

ladybrun:

kelleyboomerang:

unsubstantiatedrumors:

Hero.

Most of you have probably already read this, but this is so, so important. I think it’s a damn shame that the name of the Aurora shooter or the marathon bombers is common knowledge but not the name of this brave young man.
His father said that, “He made his mother cry, but he saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children.”
I can’t imagine such pure selflessness. I remember when I was 15, and I couldn’t have done something like this. I don’t think I’m even this selfless now.
Young heroes like Aitzaz and Malala give me hope for Pakistan, and the world. They’re the change that we need. They’re the people who you should judge Islam by, not the extremists. I know I don’t have that many followers, but please, for anyone who reads this today, spare a moment to think about this young hero and his grieving family.

This commentary is so offensive and I am so tired of seeing offensive commentary attached to this news story. Idiots who are not Pakistani need to shut their ignorant mouths about Malala and Aitazaz. they are not exceptional minorities in ~ barbaric and hostile Pakistan ~ they are representative of the majority of Pakistan’s children who are more brave, strong and educated than your media cares to show beyond the yelling dark skinned gunmen burning american flags. Don’t talk about “these people give me hope for Pakistan” as though Pakistan is a hopeless terrorist wasteland. You know nothing about Pakistan. You need to erase your commentary and sit the fuck down. 

^

coconutting-as-praxis:

ladybrun:

kelleyboomerang:

unsubstantiatedrumors:

Hero.

Most of you have probably already read this, but this is so, so important. I think it’s a damn shame that the name of the Aurora shooter or the marathon bombers is common knowledge but not the name of this brave young man.

His father said that, “He made his mother cry, but he saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children.”

I can’t imagine such pure selflessness. I remember when I was 15, and I couldn’t have done something like this. I don’t think I’m even this selfless now.

Young heroes like Aitzaz and Malala give me hope for Pakistan, and the world. They’re the change that we need. They’re the people who you should judge Islam by, not the extremists. I know I don’t have that many followers, but please, for anyone who reads this today, spare a moment to think about this young hero and his grieving family.

This commentary is so offensive and I am so tired of seeing offensive commentary attached to this news story. Idiots who are not Pakistani need to shut their ignorant mouths about Malala and Aitazaz. they are not exceptional minorities in ~ barbaric and hostile Pakistan ~ they are representative of the majority of Pakistan’s children who are more brave, strong and educated than your media cares to show beyond the yelling dark skinned gunmen burning american flags. 

Don’t talk about “these people give me hope for Pakistan” as though Pakistan is a hopeless terrorist wasteland. You know nothing about Pakistan. You need to erase your commentary and sit the fuck down. 

^

(via faineemae)

January 2, 2014 at 12:00am
0 notes

but i don’t want to think about summer internships or the future yet.

December 22, 2013 at 10:46am
169 notes
Reblogged from lolmythesis

Anselm’s ontological proof for God’s existence completely fails because he literally didn’t understand basic grammar.

lolmythesis:

Philosophy, Denison University

December 15, 2013 at 9:37am
75,751 notes
Reblogged from sorayachemaly

Two weeks ago a man in France was arrested for raping his daughter. She’d gone to her school counselor and then the police, but they needed “hard evidence.” So, she videotaped her next assault. Her father was eventually arrested. His attorney explained, “There was a period when he was unemployed and in the middle of a divorce. He insists that these acts did not stretch back further than three or four months. His daughter says longer. But everyone should be very careful in what they say.” Because, really, even despite her seeking help, her testimony, her bravery in setting up a webcam to film her father raping her, you really can’t believe what the girl says, can you?

Everyone “knows” this. Even children.

Three years ago, in fly-on-the-wall fashion of parent drivers everywhere, I listened while a 14-year-old girl in the back seat of my car described how angry she was that her parents had stopped allowing her to walk home alone just because a girl in her neighborhood “claimed she was raped.” When I asked her if there was any reason to think the girl’s story was not true, she said, “Girls lie about rape all the time.” She didn’t know the person, she just assumed she was lying…

No one says, “You can’t trust women,” but distrust them we do. College students surveyed revealed that they think up to 50% of their female peers lie when they accuse someone of rape, despite wide-scale evidence and multi-country studies that show the incident of false rape reports to be in the 2%-8% range, pretty much the same as false claims for other crimes. As late as 2003, people jokingly (wink, wink) referred to Philadelphia’s sex crimes unit as “the lying bitch unit.” If an 11-year-old girl told an adult that her father took out a Craigslist ad to find someone to beat and rape her while he watched, as recently actually occurred, what do you think the response would be? Would she need to provide a videotape after the fact?

It goes way beyond sexual assault as well. That’s just the most likely and obvious demonstration of “women are born to lie” myths. Women’s credibility is questioned in the workplace, in courts, by law enforcement, in doctors’ offices, and in our political system. People don’t trust women to be bosses, or pilots, or employees. Pakistan’s controversial Hudood Ordinance still requires a female rape victim to procure four male witnesses to her rape or risk prosecution for adultery. In August, a survey of managers in the United States revealed that they overwhelmingly distrust women who request flextime. It’s notable, of course, that women are trusted to be mothers—the largest pool of undervalued, unpaid, economically crucial labor.

— 

Soraya Chemaly, How We Teach Our Kids That Women Are Liars   

this was very hard to read, but so important.

(via chanduism)

Damn.

(via infinite—igloos)

(Source: sorayachemaly, via paywastoon)